I Bike I Vote

I Bike, I Vote: Governor

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#IBikeIVote is designed to help you make the best decision at the ballot box. Voting local is the single most important thing you can do to make Baltimore a more livable city.

For the 2018 Primary Election on June 26th, Bikemore put out a candidate questionnaire to all primary candidates, asking about their priorities and visions for transportation in Baltimore. 
 

Gubernatorial Candidates Responding:
Rushern Baker, Governor
Richard S. Madaleno, Jr., Governor
Jim Shea, Governor
Krish O'Mara Vignarajah, Governor

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

Maryland’s urbanized areas have limited space on streets, and some modes of transportation must be prioritized over others to make the most of this limited space. Please rank the below modes of transportation in order of importance:

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The State of Maryland should incentivize smart growth via infill development, transportation oriented development, and adaptive re-use. Greenfield development should receive no state subsidy, and greenfield developers should pay the full share of any road, septic, stormwater, or sewer upgrades necessary for development.

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Historically, regional transportation planning in Maryland has been structurally racist.

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The State of Maryland should conduct an equity gap analysis and disparity study of transportation investment over the past 75 years, comparing investment in private automobile travel and public transportation, biking, and walking, including analysis of where these investments were made based on race and income levels.

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The Baltimore Metropolitan Council and Baltimore Regional Transportation Board should include racial equity as a main outcome in all regional planning initiatives.

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Data shows that expanding roadways induces demand on that roadway, negating the benefits of the roadway expansion. The State of Maryland should stop expanding highways and rural/suburban roadways, and instead divert that money to proven methods of shifting mode away from private automobile use.

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The Maryland Transit Administration should immediately conduct an updated regional transit needs assessment and capital needs inventory. The needs identified should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

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The Maryland Transit Administration should update the 2002 Regional Rail Plan with a new regional transit vision, and projects identified within should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

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The MARC Growth and Investment Plan, delivering weekend service on all MARC lines, expansion to Wilmington, DE, and high-frequency express service between Baltimore and Washington should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

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The Maryland Department of Transportation should adopt a progressive Complete Streets approach, mandating all urban and suburban roadways under their control prioritize safety for people walking and biking over throughput for automobiles. These roadways should be retrofitted with ADA accessible sidewalks and low-stress, all-ages bicycle infrastructure, even if that means reducing roadway throughput for private automobiles.

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Many zoning codes in urban areas require one parking space per new dwelling unit. This is:

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Some cities have removed minimum parking requirements from their zoning code entirely, allowing the market to determine how many spaces of parking are needed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should remove minimum parking requirements.

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Some cities have instituted maximum parking requirements in their zoning codes, capping the amount of parking that can be constructed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should enact maximum parking requirements in certain zoning areas.

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Some cities mandate that the cost of parking be separated from apartment rent. This incentivizes living car free, and lowers the total cost of housing. The State of Maryland should mandate unbundling parking costs from housing.

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Some cities require employers that subsidize parking also offer an option for employees to receive that subsidy as a cash payment. The State of Maryland should mandate parking cash-out.

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Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow taller, denser, or larger buildings in areas they are now prohibited by zoning if that increase results in more affordable housing units.

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Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow large residences to be split into apartments, increasing density in neighborhoods that were traditionally single family homes.

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Speeds are too high on urban streets. In urbanized areas, Maryland should enforce a maximum speed limit of 25 mph on arterial streets, and 20 mph on local streets.

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Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras are proven to reduce fatal collisions. These cameras should be able to be used on any street, not just near schools and construction sites.

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The Automated Speed Enforcement Camera threshold is too high. Cameras should be able to issue citations for those traveling 5 miles per hour or more over the speed limit.

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SHORT ANSWER

Do you use a bicycle for transportation? If so, for what purposes and how often, and what was your last trip by bicycle?

Rushern Baker: I do not use a bicycle for daily transportation. However, my running mate, Elizabeth Embry has commuted to work by bicycle in Baltimore City and recently bicycled with Attorney General Brian Frosh into DC for the March for Our Lives. While I do not bike very frequently, I am an avid runner. I recently ran the Frederick Half Marathon and plan to run the Baltimore 10-miler in a few weeks. 

Richard S. Madaleno, Jr.: Yes, I use a bicycle for transportation. While I typically do not use a bicycle for my commute to Annapolis, my family and I do use bicycles for recreation. My husband and my two children and I sometimes use bicycles on weekends, when we are at the beach or on family trips to see the areas we are visiting. My last trip by bicycle was last summer when my family and I were on vacation at the beach. Since that time, given the very full schedule of my campaign for Governor, I have not been able to bike with my family as often as we would like.

Jim Shea: I do not use a bicycle for transportation, although I have recreationally. My daily commute is too long to use a bicycle, but I fully support the cause of giving bicycle commuters the infrastructure they need.

Krish O'Mara Vignarajah: I used to ride to work more often, before my daughter was born, but more recently it's been for recreation. My husband and I rode about 10 miles this weekend on roads that had no separation and were not sufficiently safe.

Do you use public transportation? If so, for what purpose and how often, and what was your last trip by public transportation?

Rushern Baker: As county executive, I’m afforded security detail. However, when I travel outside of the state I often use trains and public transportation.

Richard S. Madaleno, Jr.: Yes. I use public transportation, especially Metro, to travel from my home in Montgomery County to meetings and sporting events and other activities in downtown DC and then to travel back home. My last trip by public transportation was on Saturday, March 24 to attend the March for Our Lives in Washington, D.C.

Jim Shea: Yes, I do use public transportation. For years, I spent my time growing my law firm in Baltimore and Washington, D.C. I routinely use public transportation when I travel between the two cities and when I am traveling in Washington, D.C. One of the largest problems with Baltimore’s public transportation system is that it does not provide a quick and reliable service to Marylanders. That limits the viability of public transportation in the region, and fixing this problem will be one of my highest priorities.

Krish O'Mara Vignarajah: I grew up on public transit and still use it multiple times a week to get to meetings and events. My last trip on transit was earlier today on the Metro from Shady Grove to Bethesda for a meeting and two days ago I was on the Camden line from College Park to make a meeting downtown that I would have missed if I'd been stuck on 95 or 295.

Do you agree with the 2015 Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan and 2017 Separated Bike Lane Network Addendum recommendations, and if so, what budgetary or policy commitments would you make to help Baltimore close its 47 lane mile construction deficit and achieve the yearly 17 mile construction milestones?

Rushern Baker: Across Maryland counties, cities, and towns are recognizing the immense benefits of creating communities where residents can easily bike and walk for both transportation and recreation. Bicycle Master Plans like those in Baltimore City, Howard County, Anne Arundel County, and the City of Salisbury are providing a model for counties across Maryland who want to make their communities bikeable and walkable. 

First, I would increase funding for the Maryland Bikeways Program, the only program funded through the State's budget, by at least $1 million per year each year for the next 4 years. The Maryland Bikeways program provides state funding to expand bicycle facilities in communities across Maryland. Funds can be used for a variety of projects including connecting existing bikeways to shopping, employment, and transit, and bike-sharing programs. This year’s grants, totaling $20 million, are comprised of approximately $2M of state funding and $18M of federal funds. 2017 Projects included key regional trail connections funding for bike racks, installing bike routes using shared arrows, and designing future projects. 

The Hogan Administration has reduced the Bikeways program from $2.7 million in 2015 to $2.1 million in 2017. An additional 600,000 would have funded up to 20 additional projects. 

During my two terms as Prince George's County Executive, we have made significant strides in increasing opportunities for residents to use bicycles for transportation. Our successes include: 

● Improving connections and signage along the Anacostia Trail
● Working with Anne Arundel County to design and begin construction of key bridge over the Patuxent River, the last link of the WB&A Trail. 
● Connecting the WB&A to Bowie State University, the Bowie MARC Station, and adjacent communities
● Ensuring that links to metro stations such as Capitol Heights had complete streets
● Connecting communities to 4 metro stations along the Blue Line via the Central Avenue Connector enhance access to alternative modes of transportation, and support safety and mobility along the corridor
● Installing bicycle facilities along the Route 1 corridor. 
● Facilitating Bike Share

Policy Commitments

Prioritizing highway expansion is not a sustainable, long-term solution to our traffic woes. We’ve seen time and time again that more lanes on the highway leads to more cars on the road. What we have to pursue in Maryland is a cultural shift away from single-occupancy vehicles towards mass transit options. Investments in transportation infrastructure must focus on moving the most people as fast as possible, rather than moving the most cars as fast as possible. 

As Governor, I will be committed to restoring the balance between all modes of transportation at the Maryland Department of Transportation. I will appoint a Transportation Secretary who sees value in all modes of transportation and understands how affordable transportation is an essential economic development and an economic empowerment tool. 

I will create a high-level position in the Governor’s office that will provide essential coordination between the Departments of Transportation, Business, Planning, and Housing and Community Development to incorporate all modes of transportation when state funding is involved in economic and community development. The person in this position will work closely with these agencies to identify and address issues of transportation inequity in Baltimore and throughout Maryland. 

I will support legislation that requires the Maryland Department of Transportation to implement complete streets in all programs including the Maryland Transportation Authority including on the new Nice Bridge in Charles County. 

I will help communities such as Cromwell and Linthicum which requested law enforcement at their light rail stations to identify economic development opportunities that will provide the catalyst for transit-oriented development at these stations. Such development will increase transit ridership and provide employment opportunities providing a catalyst to improve the surrounding community. 

Richard S. Madaleno, Jr.: Yes. I support securing funding to implement the recommendations by using a combination of local general funding along with Maryland Department of Transportation Bikeways Grant Funding as well as federal funding from the Transportation Alternatives Programs Grant program.

Jim Shea: Yes, I agree with the master plan and the addendum recommendations. We need to promote complete streets in the city of Baltimore and across the state of Maryland. As Governor, I will work with the biking community, local jurisdictions, and my Transportation Secretary to devise a plan that prioritizes the greatest needs and develops specific timelines, metrics, and accountability standards to expand bike infrastructure, including bike lanes and racks. I will also be a leader on the state-level promoting collaboration and the expansion of infrastructure across the state.

Krish O'Mara Vignarajah: The State spends twice as much on roads as we do on transit and bike lanes combined. I commit to balancing this inequity by the end of my first term. This funding change, combined with directing MDOT and MPOs, to focus long-range planning (and federal funding, TIPs etc) on complete streets and transit, are both essential to ensure that there is sufficient coordination among levels of government and sufficient resources to ensure that projects and 17 mile/year milestones, like those laid out in the Addendum, are delivered on time, on budget, to specifications, and with maintenance plans.

As for the specifics, I think the 2017 addendum addressed many of the deficiencies of the 2015 master plan:
--Economic growth: greater focus on equity and connecting low-income areas to areas with greater job opportunities.
--Physical infrastructure: thoughtful approach given existing constraints that connects corridors and fills gaps
--Inclusion: helps ensure that cycling is a viable option for individuals of different ages, experiences, and ability levels).

At the same time, in reading the plan, there are still areas that desperately need projects that were not included and the City still appears to have no plan on how to actually achieve/fund the goal of 17 miles/year milestones. Nonetheless, what Baltimore has put together is still the most comprehensive approach in the state and I will make sure that the City has sufficient resources to implemented it--and I hope to replicate Baltimore's successes across Maryland.

What are the biggest barriers to mode shift (getting people to choose walking, biking, or public transit instead of personal vehicles), and what should Maryland and Baltimore City do to address these impediments?

Rushern Baker: The biggest barriers to getting Marylanders to use other modes of transportation are convenience, safety and affordability. Businesses are driving development to places with transportation options as we saw in Amazon’s criteria for their east coast headquarters. Providing these areas will help Maryland grow economically. As Governor, I will incentivize transit-oriented development and mixed-use development. 

Richard S. Madaleno, Jr.: There are many barriers to mode shift, ranging from personal convenience to time constraints to policies and decisions made by public bodies. Some of the biggest barriers to mode shift which we are able to impact through laws and public policies are the location of housing, the location of jobs and the general layout and design of our roads and cities. In order to address these impediments, as Governor, I would direct the state of Maryland to implement the Complete Streets program and support Plan Maryland to better coordinate the location of our jobs and our housing. I will instruct the Maryland State Highway Administration to vigorously adopt and implement a Complete Streets policy to create roads that are safe for bicyclists and pedestrians. This legislative session I am co-sponsor of the bill to establish the Complete Streets Program in Maryland. I also sponsored the law that extends protection to bicyclists traveling within crosswalks on our roads.

I will utilize all available tools, including use of federal “flex” funding, as well as Plan Maryland to support smart growth, revitalize older communities and increase affordable housing options near job centers and transportation corridors. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s flexible funding programs provide funds for transit related activities based on local planning priorities. A Madaleno administration would seek and utilize available “flex” funds for transit and congestion mitigation improvements. I support Plan Maryland and its goal of sustainable growth and development. As Governor I will determine how best to implement Plan Maryland. Once implemented, it will be important to update it periodically and to review local communities’ success in implementing it.

We need to revitalize our older existing communities and increase affordable housing near job opportunities. These goals have been key priorities for me as demonstrated by my leadership as co-sponsor of the Baltimore Regional Neighborhood Initiative Program which provides strategic investment in local housing in Baltimore and provides funding for loans and grants to develop neighborhoods with vacant properties. I championed the Rebuilding Baltimore City Communities Act which increases property tax credits for Baltimore residents. I sponsored a bill to increase community development projects which passed the Senate. These are the types of programs that we must continue to support and develop as we work to increase affordable housing options near our employment centers which in turn will result in greater utilization of public transit and walking and biking options for commuting.

Jim Shea: Currently, the largest barrier to mode-shifting is the fact that Maryland does not present a public transit, biking, or walking option that is more attractive than personal automobiles. At the end of the day, most Marylanders are going to choose the mode of transportation that is the easiest, quickest, and the most reliable. Thus, state and local governments, in conjunction with the federal government, must work to make public transit, walking, and biking more attractive options than driving a car.

In order to do that, state government must devise a statewide transportation plan – one that includes each mode of transportation. Last year, I released my transportation plan for the state of Maryland that is constructed to get Marylanders out of traffic and onto public transportation.

Krish O'Mara Vignarajah: I will work to aggressively increase mode shifts by focusing on four strategies: improving safety, increasing speed/efficiency of alternatives, enhancing ease of access, and reducing cost. Right now, we have a pricing structure and a culture, where the public transit option often takes longer and is nearly as expensive as riding a signal passenger vehicle. Every time, we try to cut corners, like replacing the desperately needed Redline with the woefully inferior BaltimoreLink, it's a disaster that frustrates folks just trying to get to work and reduces trust in government.

The only way to overcome this is to make transit service more reliable, more accessible, more frequent, and less expensive. The decision to use transit should not come at the expense of hours of meandering routes and multiple connections. We must make safe, complete streets the model statewide, including incentivizing the reallocation of road space for other modes of transportation. We need to connect the first and last miles with better integration with bikes, buses, ride sharing, or Uber/Lyft. We need to make it cheaper to get to and park at MARC and Metro stations, so folks choose to use transit options and avoid adding congestion to areas with overcapacity roads and/or insufficient parking. We must also look at other ways to incentivize transit use, as well as discourage single passenger vehicle use in congested areas, even if it means tough political calls like traffic calming measures, closed roads, fewer lanes, lower speeds, as have been demonstrated to work across the country and around the world. Also, as we're trying to fix the sins of the past, we must do everything we can to ensure that new development is smarter with more quality transportation alternatives.

Describe your vision of a healthy, safe, equitable transportation system for Baltimore City and the roles walking, biking, and public transportation play in that vision.

Rushern Baker: Traffic-related deaths are a critical problem in Maryland right now. In fact, traffic fatalities have increased by 18% in the past three years. We’ve taken similar best practices for a “Toward Zero” and have started to implement them in Prince George’s County. While this a great first step for the region, the majority of traffic fatalities occur on state roads, so state leadership is absolutely necessary to make progress on this issue. 

We have to ensure that existing residents and businesses benefit from the development around the transit hubs and preserve affordable housing options in those communities. That is why I joined County Executive Ike Leggett and University of Maryland President Wallace Loh in signing the Purple Line Corridor Community Compact that lays out four important goals: to support and grow local businesses, to build a thriving labor market, to make affordable housing available and to support vibrant communities. 

As County Executive, I have vast experience with transit-oriented development in communities such as Hyattsville, Suitland and New Carrollton. As Governor, I would continue to support transit-oriented development around Metro stations and other mass transit options. I would support policies to increase the supply of market-rate and affordable housing to accommodate the increased demand to live in transit-rich areas, such as Bethesda and Silver Spring. 

I strongly support Montgomery County Councilmember Floreen’s bill (34-17) to require housing developments with less than 20 units to contribute to the Housing Initiative Fund to provide money for affordable housing projects in the County. I also applaud the Montgomery County Council’s recent effort on a bill (36-17) to reduce the development impact tax burden on previously approved projects that provide additional dwelling units with at least 25% Moderately Priced Dwelling Units (MPDUs) in the addition. 

I would also work with local zoning authorities to encourage that the development impact fees collected from projects in a Metro Station Policy Area be used for transportation improvements located in the same Metro area or an adjacent planning area. This is key to ensuring that existing residents and businesses in transit-rich areas are able to get around their community efficiently so that they may enjoy the benefits of increased development. 

Baltimore City can benefit from the experiences of communities like Hyattsville, Suitland and New Carrollton. Each of these areas, once rundown, are now vibrant communities,, connected to the Washington Metro and the Anacostia Trail providing a lot of transportation choices. 

To begin, as Governor I will seek ways to support projects like North Avenue Rising https://northavenuerising.com/ by providing incentives to businesses who choose to relocate near metro stations in Baltimore. Having employment centers in tandem with residential, located near transit is a proven way to get people out of their cars so that they can easily bike, walk, and use transit. 

Richard S. Madaleno, Jr.: I believe we need to promptly put in place common sense safety proposals designed to ensure the safety of all who use public streets, roads and highways. The Baltimore Region needs a new strategic transportation plan that is based on the Opportunity Collaboratives efforts done through the Baltimore Metropolitan Council and HUD. This multi-year effort identifies serious gaps in access to jobs that can provide opportunity for wage growth and a way out of poverty. This plan needs political buy-in from elected officials, business community and citizens. Connecting the region to jobs and opportunities includes better connections and public transportation between Baltimore and Annapolis and Annapolis and DC. The MARC train system needs to run further north and more frequently. Commuter trains can and should be a much more significant option. This approach -- along with the initiatives described in response to other questions in this survey, such as building regional transportation authorities and implementing the Complete Streets program and Plan Maryland -- will help build a healthy, safe and equitable transportation system for Baltimore City.

Jim Shea: Baltimore needs a healthy, safe, and equitable transportation system. The Red Line would have provided a transportation lifeline to those in East and West Baltimore, but it also would have provided the city with a spine upon which other lines or spurs could be built. As Chair of the Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, some of the metrics we focused on when analyzing transportation outcomes were commute times and access to jobs. Transportation policy, when done correctly, can connect communities to job centers and create a more equitable society. However, when transportation policy is done poorly, it can isolate communities and further entrench inequality. Walking, biking, and public transportation, as I’ve outlined in my transportation plan, are crucial facets in implementing the vision of a healthy, safe, equitable transportation system.

Krish O'Mara Vignarajah: We cannot have a strong Baltimore economy when 30%+ of residents don't have access to a car or basic transportation alternatives to get to work or school. Bikemore has done incredible work raising the consciousness of the need for complete streets and rethinking our infrastructure, but we have to actually make the investments to make the vision a reality--and that's exactly what my administration will do. Expanding walking, biking, and public transportation are all critical components of building a much more vibrant and inclusive economy, improving public safety and public health outcomes, and reducing carbon emissions by 50% by the end of my second term (transportation is now the largest sector of carbon emissions in Maryland).

This is a deeply personal issue. My family fled a civil war and moved to Maryland when I was 9 months old. My parents had no jobs, $200 in their pockets, and two young children in their arms. My father got a job as a Baltimore City School Teacher (he recently retired from Western at the age of 80). We couldn't afford a car, so he would walk half a mile every day to catch the bus on Route 40 to get to work at Edmonson High. If it wasn't for that bus service, we could have been a family on welfare. I share this story because ensuring equitable transportation options is a priority for me rooted in my personal experience, which is why on my first day in office I will sign an Executive Order restarting the Red Line. This project isn't just another transportation project (as Governor Hogan treated it as he redistributed the money to places that voted for him). It's a gateway to opportunity, as are complete streets and other infrastructure projects that expand transportation opportunities for all.

How does transportation fit in your overall plan for a healthy and economically thriving Maryland? Explain your transportation philosophy.

Baker: There is significant evidence that communities that have opportunities for cycling and walking for transportation are healthier. These communities are also growing, desirable communities to live and work. In Maryland, the Marriott Corporation recently announced their move from a suburban office park to downtown Bethesda so that their employees can commute on foot, by bicycle, by transit, or by vehicle. In Baltimore, Under Armor is insisting on the same for their employees. A mix of transportation options is critical to economic development. 

Richard S. Madaleno, Jr.: As Governor I would build a strong public transportation network which is essential for the economy of our future. I support the Corridor Cities Transitway (CCT) bus rapid transit project in Montgomery County which would support jobs and ease traffic congestion. In addition, the MARC commuter system must be improved with more frequent service and expansion. I have long supported the Red Line rail transit project to improve transit in Baltimore and the state’s application to receive federal New Starts funding from the U.S. Department of Transportation for that project. Unfortunately, Governor Hogan’s abrupt cancellation of the Red Line and his withdrawal of the application for federal funding for it means that the Red Line is no longer in line to receive critical federal funds to build it. As governor I would direct my Department of Transportation to seek to revive the Red Line and determine the most feasible and expeditious means of securing federal and state funding.

I have a strong record of building and ensuring funding for an effective and comprehensive transportation system for Maryland, and of supporting our severely underfunded Metro system. I have been an aggressive supporter and promoter of affordable public transit in Maryland. I co-sponsored a bill to increase funding for our bus systems. I sponsored a bill to assist moving forward with the CCT bus rapid transit project. I introduced and passed the law eliminating the antiquated “farebox recovery rule” and replacing it with real performance metrics so that the Maryland Transit Administration (MTA) will fund additional transit projects that should result in transit improvements in Maryland. Most recently, I co-sponsored the Maryland Open Transportation Investment Decision Act that now requires transparent decision-making, including project-based scoring, for major transportation projects. This law should result in best uses of our transportation dollars and funding of projects that will provide maximum transportation results and benefits to the state. As governor I would fully implement the law and build a robust and reliable transportation system to serve the state.

I strongly believe that regional transportation authorities are essential for the future of transportation in Maryland. Regional transportation authorities can make decisions as to how best to plan for, fund, operate and maintain our transportation system. By moving from complete state control we could ensure that each region is able to achieve its transportation goals and meet the transportation needs of its people. It will be critical to structure these regional authorities so that they retain a substantial portion of the revenues raised in each region. This would also allow for the regional authority to assume funding responsibility for part of the city’s road network.

Jim Shea: As Governor, transportation will be one of my highest priorities. Updated and efficient transportation infrastructure can connect people to jobs, improve the quality of life, help grow businesses, and attract commerce. As I explained in my transportation plan, infrastructure, along with public education, are the backbone of a flourishing economy.

I believe that the goal of our transportation policy should be to reduce congestion, limit commute times, connect people to other areas of the state, and protect the environment. Widening roads will not fix the problem in the long run. In fact, road widening will only lead to more cars on the road. Instead, we must work to make alternative transportation modes more attractive than driving. To do that, we must invest in additional rail and bus lines, expand the MARC, properly maintain our current infrastructure, particularly the Baltimore Metro, and adhere to a state-wide transportation plan that reduces congestion and connects people to their jobs and schools.

Krish O'Mara Vignarajah: I envision a state where every Marylander regardless of income or zip code has true access to multiple safe and healthy transportation options. The segregation of housing and jobs--combined with the lack of transportation options to cross that chasm--prevents hundreds of thousands of Marylanders from fulfilling their economic potential. It's a root cause of poverty, crime, and the lack of opportunity and upward mobility. Transportation options and infrastructure are inherently a public good that only government can deliver--and one our state has failed at miserably for decades with a mindset and budget priorities that reflect the 1950s more than 2020.

Under my administration, equitable transportation solutions will be at the heart of my economic development, public safety, environmental, and public health agendas. I want Maryland to lead the nation in innovative multi-modal transportation solutions, not continue with the stigma of one of the most congested states in the nation. By the end of my first term, I want to ensure that walking, biking, and transit are greater budgetary and policy priorities than passenger vehicles and that every Marylander can get to work or to school in an safe and efficient manner.


This candidate survey is run by Bikemore In Action, Bikemore's 501c4 advocacy arm. 

I Bike, I Vote: 46th District

#IBikeIVote is designed to help you make the best decision at the ballot box. Voting local is the single most important thing you can do to make Baltimore a more livable city.

For the 2018 Primary Election on June 26th, Bikemore put out a candidate questionnaire to all primary candidates, asking about their priorities and visions for transportation in Baltimore. 
 

46th District Candidates Responding:

Bill Ferguson, Senate
Robbyn Lewis, Delegate
Brooke Lierman, Delegate
Nate Loewentheil, Delegate

 

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

Maryland’s urbanized areas have limited space on streets, and some modes of transportation must be prioritized over others to make the most of this limited space. Please rank the below modes of transportation in order of importance:

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The State of Maryland should incentivize smart growth via infill development, transportation oriented development, and adaptive re-use. Greenfield development should receive no state subsidy, and greenfield developers should pay the full share of any road, septic, stormwater, or sewer upgrades necessary for development.

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Historically, regional transportation planning in Maryland has been structurally racist.

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The State of Maryland should conduct an equity gap analysis and disparity study of transportation investment over the past 75 years, comparing investment in private automobile travel and public transportation, biking, and walking, including analysis of where these investments were made based on race and income levels.

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The Baltimore Metropolitan Council and Baltimore Regional Transportation Board should include racial equity as a main outcome in all regional planning initiatives.

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Data shows that expanding roadways induces demand on that roadway, negating the benefits of the roadway expansion. The State of Maryland should stop expanding highways and rural/suburban roadways, and instead divert that money to proven methods of shifting mode away from private automobile use.

46_Screen Shot 2018-05-10 at 12.13.37 PM.png


The Maryland Transit Administration should immediately conduct an updated regional transit needs assessment and capital needs inventory. The needs identified should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

46_Screen Shot 2018-05-10 at 12.13.37 PM.png


The Maryland Transit Administration should update the 2002 Regional Rail Plan with a new regional transit vision, and projects identified within should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

46_Screen Shot 2018-05-10 at 12.13.37 PM.png


The MARC Growth and Investment Plan, delivering weekend service on all MARC lines, expansion to Wilmington, DE, and high-frequency express service between Baltimore and Washington should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

46_Screen Shot 2018-05-10 at 12.13.37 PM.png


The Maryland Department of Transportation should adopt a progressive Complete Streets approach, mandating all urban and suburban roadways under their control prioritize safety for people walking and biking over throughput for automobiles. These roadways should be retrofitted with ADA accessible sidewalks and low-stress, all-ages bicycle infrastructure, even if that means reducing roadway throughput for private automobiles.

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Many zoning codes in urban areas require one parking space per new dwelling unit. This is:

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Some cities have removed minimum parking requirements from their zoning code entirely, allowing the market to determine how many spaces of parking are needed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should remove minimum parking requirements.

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Some cities have instituted maximum parking requirements in their zoning codes, capping the amount of parking that can be constructed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should enact maximum parking requirements in certain zoning areas.

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Some cities mandate that the cost of parking be separated from apartment rent. This incentivizes living car free, and lowers the total cost of housing. The State of Maryland should mandate unbundling parking costs from housing.

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Some cities require employers that subsidize parking also offer an option for employees to receive that subsidy as a cash payment. The State of Maryland should mandate parking cash-out.

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Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow taller, denser, or larger buildings in areas they are now prohibited by zoning if that increase results in more affordable housing units.

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Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow large residences to be split into apartments, increasing density in neighborhoods that were traditionally single family homes.

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Speeds are too high on urban streets. In urbanized areas, Maryland should enforce a maximum speed limit of 25 mph on arterial streets, and 20 mph on local streets.

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Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras are proven to reduce fatal collisions. These cameras should be able to be used on any street, not just near schools and construction sites.

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The Automated Speed Enforcement Camera threshold is too high. Cameras should be able to issue citations for those traveling 5 miles per hour or more over the speed limit.

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SHORT ANSWER

Do you use a bicycle for transportation? If so, for what purposes and how often, and what was your last trip by bicycle?

Bill Ferguson: Yes, but not as much as I'd like. Generally, I bike for recreational purposes and less for day-to-day transit purposes. Fall 2017 was last bike ride around the neighborhoods in the southeast. Looking forward to biking more as the weather turns this Spring. Also, last summer, I taught my son how to ride, and I'm looking forward to riding with him more often.

Robbyn Lewis: Yes. I have been car-free since 2013 (this does not account for the years during my college and graduate school years when I was also car-free). Before becoming a delegate I used mass transit, my bicycle, and ride-share as a primary means for moving around Baltimore. I live in Patterson Park Neighborhood and used to work in the Inner Harbor; during those years I rode the #40 bus or my bike to and from work daily. The last trip I had by bike was last November -- a typical trip, from home to Whole Foods in Harbor East. NB. January to April I am in session, therefore I do not use my bike as often. Because I am car-free, and because there is no quality mass transit between Baltimore and Annapolis, I live in Annapolis during the week and only go home on weekends. I use ride-share to go home to Baltimore on Friday night, and to return to Annapolis on Monday. While in Annapolis, my life revolves around the House Office Building and the State House, which are just one block apart, so I walk from home to work during session.

Brooke Lierman: I don't usually use a bicycle for transportation, although my husband does. (He commutes daily using his bike to and from downtown for work.)

Nate Loewentheil: I bike every single day to my day job; and basically bike to any meeting within three miles. I ride a Diamondback Trace.

Do you use public transportation? If so, for what purpose and how often, and what was your last trip by public transportation?

Bill Ferguson: Yes, inconsistently. I use the MTA buses predominantly whenever I have a workday in Baltimore that allows me to be at the office all day and not traveling from place to place. I also often use MTA buses and the Circulator to travel downtown. This past winter 2017 was last use of transit system.

Robbyn Lewis:  Yes, of course. I grew up in Chicago, lived in New York city for 5 years and haved live in and explored the world’s cities that have amazing transit, such as Singapore, London and Paris. Using mass transit is my default setting. I can definitively say that getting rid of my car in 2013 was one of the best decisions I have made.

My last bus trip was in late February, when I was home in Baltimore on the weekend. I rode the Orange/Blue line (used to be the #40 Quick Bus) from my home in Patterson Park to downtown, to meet a friend at Ida B’s Kitchen near City Hall.

I have advocated for, and worked to pass, measures that would increase the reliability and accessibility of our public transportation in Baltimore for the past 8 years. In 2010, I was selected to serve on the Station Area Advisory Committee for the Red Line. I was assigned to the Highlandtown-Greektown station, which was the site closest to my home. I talked to a lot of folks about concerning the Red Line-- elected officials, community leaders, nonprofit leaders, friends and allies in Baltimore city as well as in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. The message came thru clearly: to win construction funding, Baltimore needed strong leadership and advocacy for this project. What was missing in Baltimore’s advocacy ecosystem was political action on behalf of transit.

In 2011, I conceived and founded Red Line Now PAC, the first grassroots, volunteer-run political organization to demand transit investment in Baltimore’s history. I decided that if no one else would stand up for Baltimore, I would. In the lead up to the 2013 legislative session, I led Red Line Now PAC to mobilize almost 1000 residents along the project corridor from east to west, and lobbied most every city councilperson and state delegate and senator on the corridor as well. I helped to create the first ever regional transit alliance -- the Get Maryland Moving coalition -- to bring together Red Line and Purple Line advocates to fight for the 2013 Transportation funding bill. We did our small part to get that bill passed, ensuring the state’s funding for Red Line construction.

While we were all heartbroken at Governor Hogan’s reckless decision to cancel the project, I remain committed to working for modern mass transit in Baltimore City. This year in session I introduced and supported legislation to strengthen our public transit system, including HB 749, which calls for automatic enforcement of Baltimore’s dedicated bus lanes. I look forward to working with organizations like Bikemore to continue the fight for quality and equitable public transit in Baltimore.

Brooke Lierman: I use public transportation when I can, including taking the MARC to DC when going for work or political events or the MTA bus or circulator when available. My last trip on public transportation was in the fall of 2017 when I went to D.C. Since then I have (1) had a baby and (2) been working in Annapolis, so not as much time in Baltimore without lugging around a baby...

That said, I am a big believer in public transportation, and was a Red Line supporter and member of my neighborhood SAAC and a member of the Red Line Citizen Advisory Council. I also passed Hb 1010 in 2016 to create an MTA Oversight + Planning board (vetoed), and passed HB 271 to repeal the farebox mandate in 2017. In 2018, I successfully amended HB 372 to add funding for MTA and to require a capital needs assessment and new transit plan.

Nate Loewentheil: I ride the MARC whenever I have to go to DC, but rarely ride public transportation around Baltimore as I either bike or drive.

Do you agree with the 2015 Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan and 2017 Separated Bike Lane Network Addendum recommendations, and if so, what budgetary or policy commitments would you make to help Baltimore close its 47 lane mile construction deficit and achieve the yearly 17 mile construction milestones?

Bill Ferguson: Yes. I support a Complete Streets approach to transportation planning and implementation, as aligns with the Bicycle Master Plan. I look forward to working with Bikemore to identify potential state funding opportunities to expand this work in our City.

Robbyn Lewis:   Yes, I agree with the Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan and 2017 Separated Bike Lane Network Addendum recommendations. As a participant in the early Bikemore steering committee meetings back in 2011-2012, and also as a current member of Bikemore’s Board of Directors, I was engaged with the creation and drafting of both the 2015 Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan and 2017 Separated Bike Lane Network.

Brooke Lierman: Yes I think we should work on adding mandated money to the Bikeways program at MDOT to help jurisdictions around the state build more bike paths and lanes.

Nate Loewentheil: I support the Bicycle Master Plan and the 2017 Separated Bike Lane Network Addendum. I honestly don't know a great deal about how the state does or does not earmark funding for specific modes in Baltimore, but I will be a strong advocate for state funding for the city's bike network and would work with city and state agencies to explore other potential resources, e.g., Federal grants.

What are the biggest barriers to mode shift (getting people to choose walking, biking, or public transit instead of personal vehicles), and what should Maryland and Baltimore City do to address these impediments?

Bill Ferguson: Safety and security along transit routes is essential. If cyclists, walkers, runners, etc feel unsafe during travel, there is little incentive to consider modes beyond automobiles. We need to make a commitment to a real vision for multi-modal transportation throughout the City. Additionally, I would add that now having two children has made it harder to consider options beyond cars or buses for most trips. This is a difficult barrier to overcome, but it is reality for many Baltimore families.

Robbyn Lewis: The biggest barriers to mode shift are accessibility and reliability of alternative transit options. The best way to move people toward mode shift is to make it easy and pleasant to get out of their cars. We do this with a combination of incentives, including but not limited to:

1) Complete streets everywhere, in every neighborhood.
2) Minimize parking requirements, and really make it clear that we mean it by preferential approvals of development projects that follow this standard.
3) Rewarding people who choose to downsize the number of cars they own, or who go car-free.
4) Enable employers to reward employees who use bike and walking to get to work, such as I tried to do with my Parking Cash Out bill HB 1637.
5) Complete construction of Baltimore’s bike master plan with all the protected bike lanes.
6) Investment in modern mass transit infrastructure.

These are just a few ideas we have the power and knowledge and community demand to implement right now; we just need the political will. I am more than ready to work on these goals.

Brooke Lierman: Reliability and access are the biggest barriers to public transit use. Our transit system is not connected and is not reliable. It also does not go all the places it needs to go (i.e. there are no MTA stops in Historic Fell's Point. The closest is Eastern Ave, which is the very north side of FP). For biking, I think we need more protected bike lanes - that would encourage people to bike more and feel safer.

Nate Loewentheil: I would break this question into two parts: how do you get people to shift to bikes and walking; and how do you shift people to public transportation.

(1) Bikes and walking: To shift to bikes, we need to build a bike network that leads people to actually want to bike. Biking has natural advantages - exercise, speed, flexibility, cost - but the prospect of navigating Baltimore City streets deters all but the most dedicated. In addition to bike lanes - which are a must - I think the Greenway Trails Network should be a big priority. Give people a way to get around the city AND be in green space at the same time and all of a sudden you've made biking that much more attractive. To increase walking, similarly, you need to make walking a more attractive option by beautifying the streetscape and increasing public safety.

(2) Public transportation: I wrote my senior thesis in college on expanding public transportation in Baltimore City and later led transportation policy at the White House. You will not find a bigger advocate for public transportation. However, I don't see a clear path forward in Baltimore at the moment for major public transportation expansion. The experience of other cities suggests that it is very, very difficult to significantly increase bus ridership. Nor is there a short-term viable path to a major new addition to our fixed-line transit system. My priority on public transportation is to improve the experience of the people who do ride the bus and various fixed-line systems by focused on maintenance and technology that can improve on-time performance and allow for real-time tracking.

(3) I would add a third question, which is: are there alternatives to walking, bikes and public transportation? I foresee a future where more and more people opt for a combination of walking, biking and cheap on-demand car services. The costs of services like Via in New York are so low that they rival Maryland bus fare. I think we need to work to build public-private partnerships that give alternatives to city residents to owning cars. In the long-term, I believe on-demand car services offer an ideal solution to the last-mile problem and make fixed-line transit more rather than less viable in cities like Baltimore.

Describe your vision of a healthy, safe, equitable transportation system for Baltimore City and the roles walking, biking, and public transportation play in that vision.

Bill Ferguson: Ideally, we would have a comprehensive vision for transportation that focuses on effectively and efficiently moving people and goods rather than accommodating vehicular traffic. There is no excuse for our lackluster transportation system as it exists today in the City. In a perfect world, we would redesign the thousands of miles of roadways we have in the City aligned with a Complete Streets approach. In the meantime, we can move towards that vision with new transportation projects as they arise.

Robbyn Lewis: A transport system that centers human beings is what our city needs and deserves. Centering on human beings means that everyone has options that enable to get around efficiently, safely, pleasantly and sustainably without dependence on a privately owned vehicle, and no one should ever be hit by a car and injured or killed while moving around on foot or on bike.

A transport system that accomplishes these goals has the following features: 1) complete streets in every neighborhood including downtown; 2) a fully built out bicycle network, like, say, the Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan, with lots of protected infrastructure; 3) a fully built out Green Network trail; 4) an east-west light rail line to replace the Red Line; 5) expansion of MARC service with new station at Bayview; 6) world class bus service with  a rational, efficient network of routes and dedicated bus lanes that are respected and protected, with signal priority where needed. We need leadership at the city and state level to make this happen. A policy framework that will make this vision possible will include some or all of the following: 1) vision zero plan; 2) dedicated funding stream for transit that is equitable and permits high quality service as well as expansion; 3) adherence to the city's Sustainability Plan and Climate Action Plan; 4) incentives to encourage people to get out of their cars or give up their cars altogether; 5) incentives to employers so that they support workers who use walking, biking and transit; 6) a regional transportation planning entity that really works, so that we can begin to plan and build the best regional system in the world. I am committed to work on all of this.

Brooke Lierman: A healthy, safe, equitable transportation system should offer multiple options for getting around the City and region to our residents. Walking, water-taxi'ing, taking the bus or light rail or subway, and biking should all be options and should provide seamless connections. Over 1/3 of the City does not have access to a car, and that means that our public transit and bike systems are even more important to creating an equitable City where everyone can eat, work, play and get around from neighborhood to neighborhood. We are pretty far from achieving that vision, but I keep trying to push it and ensure that we keep our eye on the ball so that we are at least moving forward in state policy, and not backwards.

Nate Loewentheil: Traffic in Baltimore significantly detracts from our city's quality of life, hurts our downtown businesses, and costs a fortune in impact on our roads. We need to find ways to move people out of their cars. I am an advocate for 'complete streets' that combine streetscape beautification with bike trails, well-maintained (and well lit!) sidewalks, and of course room for cars. Per above, I also believe that technology is quickly changing the realm of the possible when it comes to on-demand point-to-point transportation.

How does transportation fit in your overall plan for a healthy and economically thriving Maryland? Explain your transportation philosophy.

Bill Ferguson: Efficient and effective transportation options are essential for a thriving regional economy. The movement of people and goods underpins the societal structures that exist in our everyday lives. Intentional transportation choices over time in Baltimore have created a disconnected and divided City. Improving our transportation infrastructure to be more equitable and complete is essential for our City to reach its fullest potential.

Robbyn Lewis: Improving the efficiency of our mass transit system is not only essential for the environment, but imperative for the economic viability of our state’s economy. Efficient and modern public transportation is crucial for access to opportunity and job growth. Transportation is at the center of my vision for a healthy, equitable, and sustainable future for our state. I believe that this future depends on reducing our dependence on cars, and investing in modern mass transit. In order for Baltimore city to grow we must build a modern mass transit system that includes complete streets, a bike network with protected lanes that connect to transit, and pedestrian amenities.

Brooke Lierman: Maryland can never be a great state with a subpar public transit system. Maryland has some of the worst commute times and most congestion in the country. Without increasing our transit options, our congestion will only get worse. In addition, because such a large percentage of Baltimoreans have no regular access to a car, in order to get employees to employers in a timely manner, we need more reliable and efficient transportation options. Employers regularly cite transportation as one of the problems facing their companies. We can change that: we have to invest in infrastructure like bus-only lanes, BRT, light rail, water taxis/ferries, and more protected bike lanes. In order to ensure that employers have access to employees and vice-versa, we need to create and fund high quality, reliable transportation options. (And not invest in huge privatized highways!)

Nate Loewentheil: Transportation is the life-blood of our city and our state. I believe providing a strong transportation system is a core function of government and that investments in our infrastructure are investments in our future.



This candidate survey is run by Bikemore In Action, Bikemore's 501c4 advocacy arm. 

I Bike, I Vote: 45th District

#IBikeIVote is designed to help you make the best decision at the ballot box. Voting local is the single most important thing you can do to make Baltimore a more livable city.

For the 2018 Primary Election on June 26th, Bikemore put out a candidate questionnaire to all primary candidates, asking about their priorities and visions for transportation in Baltimore. 
 

45th District Candidates Responding:
Marques Dent, Delegate
Linzy Jackson, Delegate
Sharon McCollough, Delegate
Cory McCray, Senate
Stephanie Smith, Delegate

 

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

Maryland’s urbanized areas have limited space on streets, and some modes of transportation must be prioritized over others to make the most of this limited space. Please rank the below modes of transportation in order of importance:

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The State of Maryland should incentivize smart growth via infill development, transportation oriented development, and adaptive re-use. Greenfield development should receive no state subsidy, and greenfield developers should pay the full share of any road, septic, stormwater, or sewer upgrades necessary for development.

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Historically, regional transportation planning in Maryland has been structurally racist.

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The State of Maryland should conduct an equity gap analysis and disparity study of transportation investment over the past 75 years, comparing investment in private automobile travel and public transportation, biking, and walking, including analysis of where these investments were made based on race and income levels.

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The Baltimore Metropolitan Council and Baltimore Regional Transportation Board should include racial equity as a main outcome in all regional planning initiatives.

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Data shows that expanding roadways induces demand on that roadway, negating the benefits of the roadway expansion. The State of Maryland should stop expanding highways and rural/suburban roadways, and instead divert that money to proven methods of shifting mode away from private automobile use.

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The Maryland Transit Administration should immediately conduct an updated regional transit needs assessment and capital needs inventory. The needs identified should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

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The Maryland Transit Administration should update the 2002 Regional Rail Plan with a new regional transit vision, and projects identified within should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

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The MARC Growth and Investment Plan, delivering weekend service on all MARC lines, expansion to Wilmington, DE, and high-frequency express service between Baltimore and Washington should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

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The Maryland Department of Transportation should adopt a progressive Complete Streets approach, mandating all urban and suburban roadways under their control prioritize safety for people walking and biking over throughput for automobiles. These roadways should be retrofitted with ADA accessible sidewalks and low-stress, all-ages bicycle infrastructure, even if that means reducing roadway throughput for private automobiles.

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Many zoning codes in urban areas require one parking space per new dwelling unit. This is:

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Some cities have removed minimum parking requirements from their zoning code entirely, allowing the market to determine how many spaces of parking are needed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should remove minimum parking requirements.

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Some cities have instituted maximum parking requirements in their zoning codes, capping the amount of parking that can be constructed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should enact maximum parking requirements in certain zoning areas.

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Some cities mandate that the cost of parking be separated from apartment rent. This incentivizes living car free, and lowers the total cost of housing. The State of Maryland should mandate unbundling parking costs from housing.

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Some cities require employers that subsidize parking also offer an option for employees to receive that subsidy as a cash payment. The State of Maryland should mandate parking cash-out.

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Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow taller, denser, or larger buildings in areas they are now prohibited by zoning if that increase results in more affordable housing units.

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Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow large residences to be split into apartments, increasing density in neighborhoods that were traditionally single family homes.

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Speeds are too high on urban streets. In urbanized areas, Maryland should enforce a maximum speed limit of 25 mph on arterial streets, and 20 mph on local streets.

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Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras are proven to reduce fatal collisions. These cameras should be able to be used on any street, not just near schools and construction sites.

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The Automated Speed Enforcement Camera threshold is too high. Cameras should be able to issue citations for those traveling 5 miles per hour or more over the speed limit.

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SHORT ANSWER

Do you use a bicycle for transportation? If so, for what purposes and how often, and what was your last trip by bicycle?

Marques Dent: Recreation and exercise. 3/17/18

Linzy Jackson: Yes, Three times a week (Spring, Summer and Fall) for exercise from home to Lake Montebello.

Sharon McCollough: No, I use a bike for exercise and leisure riding

Cory McCray: Though I do not currently use a bicycle for transportation, when I came of age in Baltimore, a bicycle or bus were commonly used modes of transit by my peers and I. As such, I still feel that I have an experiential understanding of what it’s like to be dependent on non-auto transportation. My daughters are also beginning to ride their bikes around our neighborhood. Though it is not transportation in the sense of a work commute or errands, their safety still gives me a vested interest in seeing safe neighborhood streets without speeding automobile traffic.

Stephanie Smith: No.

Do you use public transportation? If so, for what purpose and how often, and what was your last trip by public transportation?

Marques Dent: No.

Linzy Jackson: No.

Sharon McCollough: Sometimes, for downtown events and visits to Washington, D.C.

Cory McCray: As a member of the Environment and Transportation Committee, I feel a responsibility to periodically use public transportation so that I have a frame of reference for my constituents who depend on it. My last trip on public transportation occurred when my car was in the shop. I try to use opportunities like that, when I am temporarily without auto-access, to run errands or attend meetings on public transportation instead of in a rental car. Though it is certainly not the same experience as someone who deals with public transportation frustrations every day, it helps me ask the right questions of those residents when I’m trying to understand how to better serve them. This was especially helpful in 2017, when I facilitated community input on the BaltimoreLink rollout, which I felt did not utilize rider feedback to the extent it should have.

Stephanie Smith: I've used public transportation to commute to and from work for the past 11 years.

Do you agree with the 2015 Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan and 2017 Separated Bike Lane Network Addendum recommendations, and if so, what budgetary or policy commitments would you make to help Baltimore close its 47 lane mile construction deficit and achieve the yearly 17 mile construction milestones?

Marques Dent: Yes. I would make the necessary budgetary recommendations within my power to help bridge the gap,

Linzy Jackson: Yes, I will advocate for the state to allocate more funding into grants as well as the city to tap into federal funding opportunities. i.e. Bikeways Program, Highway State Grant Programs etc.

Sharon McCollough: Yes, I have a colleague who rides his bike to work (in a school) everyday.

Cory McCray: I agree with the plan and its addendum, and feel that bicycle infrastructure gives both City Government and State Government a tremendous bang-for-its-buck on investment return. Unfortunately, rank-and-file House members are not well positioned to secure funding commitments from the Governor’s budget. As 1 of only 5 Baltimore senators though, I believe that I would be much better positioned to help define the City’s priorities both for the governor and for leadership in the legislature. I am also willing to serve as a visible and vocal advocate to the public for better investment in transportation infrastructure, and faster implementation of that infrastructure.

Stephanie Smith: I believe the 2015 Plan and 2017 Addendum lay out a strong vision for improving our city's biking network. Importantly, the 2017 Addendum prioritizes protected biking infrastructure. Improved facilities are central to increasing the confidence of potential cyclists. Focused on connecting low stress streets and facilities, this lays the foundation for connecting higher stress streets in the near future. The 2017 Addendum thoughtfully lays out a funding scheme that includes a mix of city, state and federal sources. I support advocating for an overall increase in Bikeways state grant funding to help support the implementation of both plans.

What are the biggest barriers to mode shift (getting people to choose walking, biking, or public transit instead of personal vehicles), and what should Maryland and Baltimore City do to address these impediments?

Marques Dent: Socialize the environmental and safety benefits of not using personal vehicles.

Linzy Jackson: I believe it comes down to people feeling safe walking, riding and convenience. The city is moving in the right direction with bike safely and that need to me promoted, we have people who really want to bike and a good awareness campaign can and could encourage more bikers and walkers.

Sharon McCollough: Crime which is a challenge across our city at this time. Revamp our juvenile justice system, initiatives to restore trust in our law enforcement, safety measures for our schools and wrap around services to meet the needs of our communities.

Cory McCray: There has to be a culture shift that moves a critical mass of Baltimore residents towards using alternative modes of transportation as a first choice. The biggest barrier to that culture shift is poor service. We can get more Baltimoreans riding buses, riding bikes, and walking if we invest in infrastructure that makes these modes more convenient, safe, and reliable. City and State government have to make more significant investments in that infrastructure to do so though. There is no other plausible path.

Stephanie Smith: As the 2017 Addendum notes, potential cyclists often have concerns about biking safety that impact their willingness to try cycling as part of their commute. Additionally, Baltimore's subway has a limited scope. In contrast with the DC region, Baltimore's public transit system is quite limited and receives anemic state investment.

Baltimore's potential for a deeply connected multi-modal transit system is quite high. Currently, Baltimore is already a city where roughly 1/3 of residents lack access to a car. Burgeoning job hubs are increasingly located just outside of the City of Baltimore notably in the Hunt Valley and BWI Business District. Limited, inconvenient or time consuming public transit places many of Baltimore's hardest hit communities at a competitive disadvantage when commuting to these corridors without a car.

Improving the safety and quality of biking and utilizing public transit is a story of investment. As the nation's major metro regions clamored to attract Amazon, the lack of investment in a comprehensive public transit system exposed one of Baltimore's primary weaknesses. Improved public transit and biking infrastructure must be seen as an essential building block for regional competitiveness and receive the local and state investments to match.

Describe your vision of a healthy, safe, equitable transportation system for Baltimore City and the roles walking, biking, and public transportation play in that vision.

Marques Dent: They are at the core of our transportation priorities. Less cars on the streets and more bikes.

Linzy Jackson: We know that 1/3 of our City Residents lack access to a car and reliable transportation. And honestly, I haven't sat and thought about what a healthy, safe, equitable transportation system looks like for Baltimore. I am eager to learn your organizations vision, and becoming a partner in Annapolis if elected.

Sharon McCollough: More jobs in and throughout communities, eliminate food deserts, promote and encourage nutrition, create environments that allow communities to have an environment that provides places to walk, bike and or use public transportation.

Cory McCray: Walking, biking, and public transportation can make our City safer and healthier not just in conventional terms like improving activity levels or being better for the environment, but because greater usage of public spaces makes it more difficult for crimes to occur there. I believe that the more vibrant our streetscape is, the safer it will be. Of course, that also means building infrastructure that makes pedestrians safer from harm by automobile traffic.

Equity is a huge issue for me when it comes to any type of infrastructure- it’s why I passed legislation that requires future investments in City school buildings to be graded on the basis of need. I believe the same should be true of transportation investments, and have spoken with Ryan Dorsey about that aspect of his Complete Streets bill. Programs like BikeShare or the Charm City Circulator are easier to sell when we’re providing them to all of our communities.

My vision for Baltimore’s transportation system is one that improves service to neighborhoods that are underserved by our current infrastructure, and that understands multi-modal systems are the way of the future. The writing is on the wall in every other thriving City across the country. We cannot continue to ignore that reality here.

Stephanie Smith: I support the Transportation Equity Principles laid forth by the PolicyLink Transportation Equity Caucus with minor modifications:
1) Provide affordable and reliable transportation options for all people.
2) Ensure fair access to quality jobs, workforce development, and contracting opportunities in the transportation industry.
3) Promote healthy, safe, and inclusive communities.
4) Use an equity lens for investments and focus on results.

How does transportation fit in your overall plan for a healthy and economically thriving Maryland? Explain your transportation philosophy.

Marques Dent: Transportation is fundamental how we as Marylanders provide for our families. we must have a safe and affordable opportunities to get to and from work.

Linzy Jackson: It's not secret that more people walk and ride when its a safe infrastructure in place. The more people that feel safe walking and riding in the city will move to the city and then the city will benefit economically. The more residents riding will then decrease traffic congestion and improve air quality for our families and children.

Sharon McCollough: I support public transportation, however, it needs to meet the needs of all people and communities. I believe that public transportation helps to improve our environment in a number of ways and therefore should be utilized in a fashion that is productive and efficient to and for everyone.

Cory McCray: I see transportation as a spur for better outcomes. Easy access to fast, affordable, reliable transportation means easy access to opportunity, whether it’s a job, a school, healthcare, groceries, or anything else a City resident might need. I believe public transportation is the best way to create that access for every City resident, no matter their income levels.

Stephanie Smith: Where one works, goes to school, secures health care, and experiences recreation and leisure is directly tied to mobility (transit/economic). Our state is small but a microcosm of the transit challenges that exist throughout the nation. An affordable, reliable and environmentally sustainable transportation system is primary to maintaining/improving Maryland's economic competitiveness. There is tremendous potential to better connect the DC and Baltimore regions and that will require parity in transit investments.

Not unlike every other facet of American life, transportation policy has been shaped by institutional inequity and racial bias. In Baltimore, there is a legacy of communities of color being adversely impacted by federal/state/local transportation policies. Employing an equity lens for the funding, conception and design of transportation projects is critical to moving Baltimore and Maryland forward.



This candidate survey is run by Bikemore In Action, Bikemore's 501c4 advocacy arm. 

I Bike, I Vote: 43rd District

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#IBikeIVote is designed to help you make the best decision at the ballot box. Voting local is the single most important thing you can do to make Baltimore a more livable city.

For the 2018 Primary Election on June 26th, Bikemore put out a candidate questionnaire to all primary candidates,asking about their priorities and visions for transportation in Baltimore. 

43rd District Candidates Responding:
Regina T. Boyce, Delegate
Nilesh Kalyanaraman, Delegate
Maggie McIntosh, Delegate
Mary Washington, Senate


 

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

Maryland’s urbanized areas have limited space on streets, and some modes of transportation must be prioritized over others to make the most of this limited space. Please rank the below modes of transportation in order of importance:

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The State of Maryland should incentivize smart growth via infill development, transportation oriented development, and adaptive re-use. Greenfield development should receive no state subsidy, and greenfield developers should pay the full share of any road, septic, stormwater, or sewer upgrades necessary for development.

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Historically, regional transportation planning in Maryland has been structurally racist.

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The State of Maryland should conduct an equity gap analysis and disparity study of transportation investment over the past 75 years, comparing investment in private automobile travel and public transportation, biking, and walking, including analysis of where these investments were made based on race and income levels.

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The Baltimore Metropolitan Council and Baltimore Regional Transportation Board should include racial equity as a main outcome in all regional planning initiatives.

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Data shows that expanding roadways induces demand on that roadway, negating the benefits of the roadway expansion. The State of Maryland should stop expanding highways and rural/suburban roadways, and instead divert that money to proven methods of shifting mode away from private automobile use.

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The Maryland Transit Administration should immediately conduct an updated regional transit needs assessment and capital needs inventory. The needs identified should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

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The Maryland Transit Administration should update the 2002 Regional Rail Plan with a new regional transit vision, and projects identified within should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

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The MARC Growth and Investment Plan, delivering weekend service on all MARC lines, expansion to Wilmington, DE, and high-frequency express service between Baltimore and Washington should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

Screen Shot 2018-05-09 at 1.42.57 PM.png


The Maryland Department of Transportation should adopt a progressive Complete Streets approach, mandating all urban and suburban roadways under their control prioritize safety for people walking and biking over throughput for automobiles. These roadways should be retrofitted with ADA accessible sidewalks and low-stress, all-ages bicycle infrastructure, even if that means reducing roadway throughput for private automobiles.

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Many zoning codes in urban areas require one parking space per new dwelling unit. This is:

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Some cities have removed minimum parking requirements from their zoning code entirely, allowing the market to determine how many spaces of parking are needed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should remove minimum parking requirements.

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Some cities have instituted maximum parking requirements in their zoning codes, capping the amount of parking that can be constructed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should enact maximum parking requirements in certain zoning areas.

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Some cities mandate that the cost of parking be separated from apartment rent. This incentivizes living car free, and lowers the total cost of housing. The State of Maryland should mandate unbundling parking costs from housing.

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Some cities require employers that subsidize parking also offer an option for employees to receive that subsidy as a cash payment. The State of Maryland should mandate parking cash-out.

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Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow taller, denser, or larger buildings in areas they are now prohibited by zoning if that increase results in more affordable housing units.

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Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow large residences to be split into apartments, increasing density in neighborhoods that were traditionally single family homes.

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Speeds are too high on urban streets. In urbanized areas, Maryland should enforce a maximum speed limit of 25 mph on arterial streets, and 20 mph on local streets.

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Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras are proven to reduce fatal collisions. These cameras should be able to be used on any street, not just near schools and construction sites.

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The Automated Speed Enforcement Camera threshold is too high. Cameras should be able to issue citations for those traveling 5 miles per hour or more over the speed limit.

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SHORT ANSWER

Do you use a bicycle for transportation? If so, for what purposes and how often, and what was your last trip by bicycle?

Regina T. Boyce: Yes, I bike depending on my day and the purpose: distance, weather, recreation and where I am going. I generally walk to work (too short of a distance to ride my bike). I love Bike Party and attend regularly. I began bike riding in 2009 when I tore my Achilles playing soccer. The doctor recommended bike riding as physical therapy because I usually ran. After this encounter I began riding my bike with a friend to work at city hall. After a while the friend couldn’t ride with me so I rode alone and began learning more about biking in the city going as far as getting a bike map and learning the routes. Before leaving city hall in 2015, I was appointed to the Mayor’s Bicycle Advisory Commission. Because I walk to work, and many other places, I ride my bike maybe once or twice a month during the winter months (I don’t ride well in the cold) and as much as once or twice a week in the spring, summer and fall months. The last time I rode my bike was in November, I believe.

Nilesh Kalyanaraman: I do not because of my need to travel during work hours.

Maggie McIntosh: I don't use a bicycle as my primary mode of transportation, but am an avid recreational rider. I've done the Seagull Century 4 times and have ridden from Pittsburgh to Washington, DC twice.

Mary Washington: I am primarily a recreational cyclist. These activities occur primarily around Lake Montebello, Gwynn Falls Trail and other trails created from rails in Maryland. Occasionally, I use my bicycle as a mode of transportation to run errands within a ½ mile of my house.

Do you use public transportation? If so, for what purpose and how often, and what was your last trip by public transportation?

Regina T. Boyce: Yes, I do when I need to. I’m multi-modal. I walk to work which is a luxury. This means that I drive my car maybe once or twice a week if at all (weekend family and church, week day out of city meetings). I sometimes have meetings downtown as well as dentist appointments, I ride the circulator downtown to my meetings and dentist’s appointments. I don’t often have the opportunity to take the MTA. The last time I took the MTA was in August. My license was expired, and I missed the renewal due to being out of town for my birthday. I took the bus (citylink red to #28) to the MVA. I was surprised how quickly I got to the MVA. The last time I took the circulator (purple) was February and January of this year.

Nilesh Kalyanaraman: I use it on occasion but cannot rely on it during the workday because I have to travel to multiple sites.

Maggie McIntosh: I use public transportation when it is convenient, but admittedly not as my primary mode of transportation. During the legislative session I mostly walk, but I have been riding the DC Metro often when visiting family in Washington. My most recent trip was on the Metro to the March for Our Lives on March 24th.

Mary Washington: I firmly believe that public transportation benefits all of us. I am a strong advocate because it reduces pollution, eases traffic congestion, and helps our communities thrive. Public bus and subway transportation is not my primary mode of transportation; however I am well aware that for many whose jobs require them to travel all around Baltimore, they do not have a choice. BaltimoreLINK system buses should be more frequent and reliable, and I believe more people would be able to use it more regularly if that was the case. I do use the MARC train when I travel to Washington DC and that last trip was in December 2017.

Do you agree with the 2015 Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan and 2017 Separated Bike Lane Network Addendum recommendations, and if so, what budgetary or policy commitments would you make to help Baltimore close its 47 lane mile construction deficit and achieve the yearly 17 mile construction milestones?

Regina T. Boyce: Yes, I agree with 2015 Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan and 201 Separated Bike Lane Network Addendum recommendations. I support the reauthorization of any funds that city DOT has lost or let lapse because of its delay in implementing proposed bike infrastructure. I also support complete streets in local and state-wide transportation planning and would support legislation to make it happen.

Nilesh Kalyanaraman: I do agree with the 2015 Master Plan and the 2017 Addendum. The annual cost for the next 10 years in $5.4M and I commit to allocating the funding needed for lane construction.

Maggie McIntosh: I agree that the Baltimore would be well-served expanding its bicycle infrastructure, and must make the necessary investments to do so. As chair of the Appropriations Committee, this session I helped to secure new Highway User Revenues for Baltimore City (and other counties) which are used by local governments for projects like separated bike lanes. I also made sure funding was dedicated for a road diet/complete streets project along the Harford Road corridor as a proof-of-concept, which will hopefully influence City policies and future priorities.

Mary Washington: In cities like Baltimore, and other urban areas across Maryland, public transit provides vital connections to jobs, education, medical care, and our larger communities. As a former member of the Baltimore City Commission on Sustainability, I agree with the components of the 2015 Master Plan and the 2017 Addendum which make bicycling a more feasible mode of transportation in this city. As stated in an earlier response, reducing the role of automobiles (i.e. public transportation) will improve air quality and protect our ecosystem. Making the city streets more bike-friendly will open new transportation options for people who can’t afford cars or prefer greener forms of transportation. The addendum does an excellent job at encouraging the more casual bicyclist to ride on city streets. If elected Senator, I will build on my work and relationships with local leaders to encourage the city to support and fund these measures. On the state level, I will sponsor legislation that sets policy and budgetary priorities to achieve these goals in Baltimore City and the region.

What are the biggest barriers to mode shift (getting people to choose walking, biking, or public transit instead of personal vehicles), and what should Maryland and Baltimore City do to address these impediments?

 

Regina T. Boyce: The biggest barriers to mode shift, in Baltimore City, is lack of investment, lack of information/education regarding the benefits of different modes especially to underserved and under resourced communities, the shame that is placed on any mode that isn’t car and the false perception that shifts in modes have for/against those of a certain class/race (ex. Biking is for white people). The lack of investment, like for instance the Red Line, reinforces the perception in Baltimore that all modes other than the automobile are second class, and exist only for those without a car. The city has historically failed to work with state transportation to prioritize bus traffic and has been slow and resist to approve innovative modes, especially bike infrastructure. To address these impediments, the City and the Maryland must make getting around the city and the state, without a car, a priority by creating and disseminating information (TV, radio, mailing, email, social media) about how “we get around”. The information will show how Baltimoreans “get around” through the very modes we want more people to understand and use. The more we cut down on vehicle traffic, the more buses can get to destinations on time and those interested in biking will bike.

Nilesh Kalyanaraman: Safety and ease of use are the two most important barriers to getting people to shift their mode of transportation from personal vehicles to walking, biking or pubic transit. A Complete Streets program that balances the needs of the various modes of transportation will promote a shift from personal vehicles to other forms of transportation.

Maggie McIntosh: The biggest impediments to choice riders choosing walking, biking, or public transit are reliability, safety, and time-savings. To promote bicycling and walking, we can pursue policies that prioritize street space for those modes of travel, and we can invest at the state and local level in bicycle infrastructure. For public transit, we need to make capital and operating investments into MTA to ensure that we can provide an adequate level of service and offer features that riders would use, like real-time bus tracking. Finally, we need to pursue policies locally and/or at the state level that take cars off the road and disincentivize car ownership.

Mary Washington: One of the major barriers to “mode shift” based on my observations as a Baltimore City resident, with school-aged children who have relied on public transit, and as a member of the Appropriations Committee for four years, is that MTA public transportation lines are poorly integrated, slow and unreliable. Secondly, most of our major city streets are designed to move cars as quickly as possible rather than to meet the needs of bus riders, pedestrians and cyclists. In order to remove these barriers, state and local government need to take strong steps to improve our public transportation systems and to re-design our roads on the complete streets model.

For example, properly funding the maintenance and improvement of Metro rail in Baltimore and the Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan will encourage people to either walk or bike to their metro station. With more cars off the roads, currently high stress streets will become easier to bike. While there are problems with the BaltimoreLINK bus system, merely tinkering with the bus routes will not encourage more ridership. In order to make public transportation work, priority has to be given to public transportation over private transportation. Providing guaranteed right-of-ways to buses or rail will make it a more efficient and attractive choice for commuting. Building the Red Line and taking other steps to improve cross-town public transportation would be a huge step forward, as would finding ways to make our existing bus routes, light rail and Metro systems work together much more effectively.

Describe your vision of a healthy, safe, equitable transportation system for Baltimore City and the roles walking, biking, and public transportation play in that vision.

Regina T. Boyce: My vision for a healthy, safe, equitable transportation system for Baltimore City and he roles walking, biking, and public transportation play in that vision is that all residents are within a reasonable commute to and from work, educational opportunity, family and play (social), by a mode of transportation that is affordable for all, and that does not rely heavily on car or even a need for a car. I vision a city where construction workers can jump on the transit to get to their worksite by 6am and late shift workers can jump on transit to get home in the late hours of the morning. For Baltimore City to grow and thrive as other cities with adequate transit choices have, it must have comprehensive public transportation supported by biking and pedestrian infrastructure that gets them around in and around town, vs the infrastructure we have now that heavily relies on vehicles and is built to get people in and out of the city, not in and around the city.

Nilesh Kalyanaraman: A healthy transportation system is one the encourages physical activity, limits pollution and is efficiently gets people to where they need to go. In Baltimore, we need to develop our infrastructure to provide faster and more comprehensive public transportation and low stress continuous bicycle routes. Every neighborhood should be walkable from both a safety and access standpoint.

Maggie McIntosh: First and foremost, our system needs to actually BE a system, where different modes really fit together to achieve some measurable goal. We need to expand bicycle infrastructure not just in well-off communities, but in places in our city where car ownership is not the norm. I believe we need bus service that is affordable, clean, and serves all communities equally. I believe that we need to expand light rail or metro lines to ensure that people can get North-South or East-West quickly. I believe we ought to expand Circulator service to neighborhoods where free, reliable service to downtown is a real need and would have a major impact. Finally, I believe we need to measure our transportation network against a measurable, achievable goal. One metric I would propose is working to where, via a combination of bicycle and/or different modes of public transit, a person can get from any point in Baltimore City to major employment hubs like BWI within an hour or less.

Mary Washington: The current system of public transportation does not meet the needs of those who need it the most. Neighborhoods must be linked to job centers. Further expansion of the current subway is critical to meeting this goal. Increasing access to transportation hubs like Mondawmin, and increasing the number of transportation hubs will also help to make public transportation work. The current bikeshare program has ignored these neighborhoods and links and must be expanded to work in concert with public transportation. The current bikeshare system should include neighborhoods that are lacking in transportation options and link East and West Baltimore to downtown. Ultimately, people should be able to find an efficient mode of transportation within a 6-block walk, or 1-mile bike ride. Protected bike lanes should be expanded to neighborhoods with few transportation options to make biking to work a safe and reliable form of transportation.

How does transportation fit in your overall plan for a healthy and economically thriving Maryland? Explain your transportation philosophy.

Regina T. Boyce: Transportation fits in my overall plan for a healthy and economically thriving Maryland because transportation has been a way of life for me since I can remember. While now I have a car, I often think about my life when I lived in Montgomery County and Baltimore County. My family walked and took the bus/subway everywhere. It was not a cumbersome way of life, it was the way of like. My friends and I look back at middle school (11-13) and thought about how at this age, as early as 11, we all took the bus and the subway to go to the mall, DC, the movies, the fairgrounds, etc. It was easy, and no one worried about us “taking transportation”. During a tough time in my family’s life, I briefly lived with my grandmother and aunt in DC.I took the bus from DC to Rockville to get to school every morning. I was at school within an hour to an hour and half. It was easy, I was 14, and it was possible because of a wonderful transportation system. When our family moved to Baltimore county we took the bus then too. I attended college and caught three buses to get from Security Blvd and Rolling Road to Towson University. My philosophy is that transportation shouldn’t be a barrier for the people who use it and use it the most. Transportation should get people to the places and spaces they need to get to safely and on time . . . after all that is what they pay for. Transportation should be easy and stress free. Transportation shouldn’t take an unreasonable amount of time. There should be no shame or stigma in using transportation. If we make similar investments in transportation as other cities have - bus, railway, biking and pedestrian infrastructure - we will see Baltimore, and Maryland, thrive in its own unique way.

Nilesh Kalyanaraman: As part of my public health approach to addressing Baltimore's needs, transportation improvements are critical in improving the lives of Baltimoreans. For many residents of Baltimore, personal vehicles or sub-optimal mass transit are currently the only meaningful choices for transportation. A combination of walkable streets, bicycle friendly streets and improved mass transit will decrease pollution, decrease stress and improve quality of life.

Maggie McIntosh: Whether it is for economic reasons or a matter of personal choice, I know that more younger people use bicycles or public transportation as their primary way to get around and that employers have taken notice. I view investments into our transportation infrastructure as a primary part of our state's economic development strategy, as well as our community development strategy.

Mary Washington: My transportation philosophy focuses on making more public transit options and other alternatives to car-based commuting available to more of the city to help build a cleaner, greener Baltimore and open up new economic opportunities for families and communities in need.

Creating a fast and reliable public transportation system will provide Baltimore’s workforce with a convenient mode of traveling to work and open up new opportunities for thousands of low and moderate-income area residents. In Baltimore today, more than 60,000 people do not have access to a car -- and many of them face commutes of an hour or more to get to job centers and find it very difficult and time-consuming to get access to education and job training opportunities or even reach the services their families needs. The Baltimore Metropolitan Council and other groups have identified this as both a major economic problem for city families and a major barrier to the region’s future growth.

Our current public transportation system, which focuses on often slow and unreliable bus service, leaves too many commuters stuck waiting too long, with little idea when their bus will arrive. So most area commuters who can afford to do so use their personal vehicles to drive downtown and commute around the area. This creates more car congestion in our central city, and helps make the streets unfriendly to cyclists and pedestrians.

A comprehensive public transit system will make it much easier for lower-income residents to get to work and access fresh groceries and other critical services. It will also enable more of those who can afford a car to choose a more environmentally friendly bicycle or public-transportation commute to work. By helping get cars off of the streets, this will make cycling and walking safer and more viable ways to get around the city as well.



This candidate survey is run by Bikemore In Action, Bikemore's 501c4 advocacy arm. 

I Bike, I Vote: 41st District

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#IBikeIVote is designed to help you make the best decision at the ballot box. Voting local is the single most important thing you can do to make Baltimore a more livable city.

For the 2018 Primary Election on June 26th, Bikemore put out a candidate questionnaire to all primary candidates,asking about their priorities and visions for transportation in Baltimore. 

41st District Candidates Responding:
Tony Bridges, Delegate
Richard Bruno, Delegate
Angela C. Gibson, Delegate
J.D. Merrill, Senate
George E. Mitchell, Delegate
Sean Stinnett, Delegate
 

 

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

Maryland’s urbanized areas have limited space on streets, and some modes of transportation must be prioritized over others to make the most of this limited space. Please rank the below modes of transportation in order of importance:

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The State of Maryland should incentivize smart growth via infill development, transportation oriented development, and adaptive re-use. Greenfield development should receive no state subsidy, and greenfield developers should pay the full share of any road, septic, stormwater, or sewer upgrades necessary for development.

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 3.13.37 PM.png


Historically, regional transportation planning in Maryland has been structurally racist.

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The State of Maryland should conduct an equity gap analysis and disparity study of transportation investment over the past 75 years, comparing investment in private automobile travel and public transportation, biking, and walking, including analysis of where these investments were made based on race and income levels.

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 3.13.37 PM.png


The Baltimore Metropolitan Council and Baltimore Regional Transportation Board should include racial equity as a main outcome in all regional planning initiatives.

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 3.18.54 PM.png


Data shows that expanding roadways induces demand on that roadway, negating the benefits of the roadway expansion. The State of Maryland should stop expanding highways and rural/suburban roadways, and instead divert that money to proven methods of shifting mode away from private automobile use.

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 3.18.54 PM.png


The Maryland Transit Administration should immediately conduct an updated regional transit needs assessment and capital needs inventory. The needs identified should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 3.18.54 PM.png


The Maryland Transit Administration should update the 2002 Regional Rail Plan with a new regional transit vision, and projects identified within should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 3.18.54 PM.png


The MARC Growth and Investment Plan, delivering weekend service on all MARC lines, expansion to Wilmington, DE, and high-frequency express service between Baltimore and Washington should be prioritized for full funding, even if it means delaying or canceling planned road expansion projects.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 2.50.57 PM.png


The Maryland Department of Transportation should adopt a progressive Complete Streets approach, mandating all urban and suburban roadways under their control prioritize safety for people walking and biking over throughput for automobiles. These roadways should be retrofitted with ADA accessible sidewalks and low-stress, all-ages bicycle infrastructure, even if that means reducing roadway throughput for private automobiles.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 2.53.09 PM.png


Many zoning codes in urban areas require one parking space per new dwelling unit. This is:

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 2.54.52 PM.png


Some cities have removed minimum parking requirements from their zoning code entirely, allowing the market to determine how many spaces of parking are needed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should remove minimum parking requirements.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 2.58.12 PM.png


Some cities have instituted maximum parking requirements in their zoning codes, capping the amount of parking that can be constructed in a new building. Local urban jurisdictions in Maryland should enact maximum parking requirements in certain zoning areas.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 3.02.01 PM.png


Some cities mandate that the cost of parking be separated from apartment rent. This incentivizes living car free, and lowers the total cost of housing. The State of Maryland should mandate unbundling parking costs from housing.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 3.20.40 PM.png

Some cities require employers that subsidize parking also offer an option for employees to receive that subsidy as a cash payment. The State of Maryland should mandate parking cash-out.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 3.22.44 PM.png


Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow taller, denser, or larger buildings in areas they are now prohibited by zoning if that increase results in more affordable housing units.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 3.25.49 PM.png


Urban jurisdictions in Maryland should allow large residences to be split into apartments, increasing density in neighborhoods that were traditionally single family homes.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 3.28.32 PM.png

Speeds are too high on urban streets. In urbanized areas, Maryland should enforce a maximum speed limit of 25 mph on arterial streets, and 20 mph on local streets.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 3.30.48 PM.png

Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras are proven to reduce fatal collisions. These cameras should be able to be used on any street, not just near schools and construction sites.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 3.33.01 PM.png


The Automated Speed Enforcement Camera threshold is too high. Cameras should be able to issue citations for those traveling 5 miles per hour or more over the speed limit.

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SHORT ANSWER

Do you use a bicycle for transportation? If so, for what purposes and how often, and what was your last trip by bicycle?

Tony Bridges: Yes. I ride recreationally by myself and with young children, ages 9 and 11. My last ride was with my children approximately a month ago. As I complete this survey, there are calls for snow showers!

Richard Bruno: Yes, in my previous job I bike commuted everyday, these days I bicycle about once a week, especially to get around my neighborhood. I was on my bike today.

Angela C. Gibson: Yes, I use my bicycle for personal exercise when time permits. No recent trips.

J.D. Merrill: I do not use a bicycle for transportation. My bicycle is primarily used for exercise. It is currently on a trainer stand in my home office to provide exercise during the winter months. My primary method of transportation is a zero emissions 2017 Chevrolet Bolt.

George E. Mitchell: No

Sean Stinnett: Yes. I use my bike to travel throughout my neighborhood (West Arlington) to check on my neighbors. I'm president of the association and I do this 2-3 days of the week. This issue is one of the reasons why I have Christopher Ervin as part of my team to assist in addressing the bike issues.

Do you use public transportation? If so, for what purpose and how often, and what was your last trip by public transportation?

Tony Bridges: Yes. Unfortunately, as you know, Maryland does not have a state-of-the-art public transportation system, and, accordingly, my trips on public transportation are limited. I would like to change this! Our underfunded and limited public transportation system hurts my future constituents, who, unlike me, may be completely dependent on using public transportation for their livelihood. My last trip was taking the Maryland's lightrail to see the Ravens.

Richard Bruno: Yes, I use public transportation (bus) about once a week, often to get to work. My last trip by public transportation was a couple weeks ago.

Angela C. Gibson: Yes, I have utilized public transportation for my transportation needs for professional and personal use.

J.D. Merrill: I rarely use public transportation, when I have used it is has been to get home from work on the bus, attend an Orioles game via Light Rail, or get around downtown on the Charm City Circulator. I last used public transportation in November 2017 when I took the bus home from work.

George E. Mitchell: No.

Sean Stinnett: Yes. I use the metro & light-rail 2-3 per week coming and going to and from work and to my daughter's school (The Mount Washington School).

Do you agree with the 2015 Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan and 2017 Separated Bike Lane Network Addendum recommendations, and if so, what budgetary or policy commitments would you make to help Baltimore close its 47 lane mile construction deficit and achieve the yearly 17 mile construction milestones?

Tony Bridges: Yes, I support the Baltimore Bicycle Master plan; I would need to study the 2017 recommendations.

Richard Bruno: Yes, I strongly agree with the 2015 Plan and the 2017 Addendum. At the state level, I will champion a vulnerable road user law, a safe passing law, increased funding for the Maryland Bikeways Program, and, especially statewide complete streets legislation. I am a strong admirer of the advocacy of Councilman Ryan Dorsey and Delegate Robbyn Lewis for complete streets, and I will be a legislator in their mold.

Angela C. Gibson: I agree with both plans and recommendations. In order to finance I support acquiring local funding and grants from State and Federal Governments.

J.D. Merrill: I agree with both of these plans. Increased bike use is a relatively inexpensive and environmentally conscious way to improve transportation in Baltimore and other Maryland cities. Baltimore needs better signage and facilities on almost all of its streets but the most effective short term investments would be separated lanes on major streets that would allow bicycle traffic to cross and flow with major streets. At the state level I will work to increase state assistance for bike facility construction all over the state.

George E. Mitchell: I need more information to make a positive determination about this question.

Sean Stinnett: Yes I support and support the Greenway proposition that is proposed for Baltimore.

What are the biggest barriers to mode shift (getting people to choose walking, biking, or public transit instead of personal vehicles), and what should Maryland and Baltimore City do to address these impediments?

Tony Bridges: One of my primary goals as State Delegate is to encourage and strengthen economic development opportunities in the 41st. To this end, I have consistently for the last fifteen years in my professional life advocated for transit-oriented development, and I will continue to do so once elected.

Richard Bruno: The biggest barrier to mode shift is that the infrastructural capacity of the city is constrained by bad policy decisions at the state level (e.g., the recent cancellation of the Red Line and implementation of the CityLink bus “reform”), and the simple fact that the city’s roads are designed to accommodate commuters, many of whom live in the county. The one-third of Baltimoreans who do not own a car, who more often than not commute within the city (rather than between the city and the suburbs), and who tend to be low-income and black—these Baltimoreans are not considered when road infrastructure designs are made. I work in a clinic serving the uninsured population, and I can tell you that many of my patients have seen their commutes double or even triple with the implementation of the CityLink cuts.

Angela C. Gibson: We need to minimize subsidizing personal vehicles and parking garages over smart growth and utilize public transportation and alternative transportation alternatives such as bicycles.

J.D. Merrill: The biggest barriers to mode shift are the lack of complete streets, neighborhood development that serves residents, the real and perceived dangers of biking, and a disjointed, disconnected, unreliable and inefficient transit system. At the state level we have to help local government transition to complete streets, make dedicated bike lanes safer, and improve our public transportation system.

George E. Mitchell: The biggest barrier to mode shifting is safety. No matter if you are walking, riding a bike or on public transportation you are concerned for your safety. It is important to make sure people are safe by having plain clothes officers ride the public transportation system.

Sean Stinnett: Urban planning should be around walking, biking and public transportation. Maryland and Baltimore City need to accommodate these modes of transportation first and make it more appealing to the public than personal vehicles.

Describe your vision of a healthy, safe, equitable transportation system for Baltimore City and the roles walking, biking, and public transportation play in that vision.

Tony Bridges: My vision for a healthy transportation system includes seeing my son and daughter riding bicycles to the park, my neighbors being able walk the streets unimpeded and unafraid, and my relatives being able to easily access public transportation to get to their jobs in way that is affordable and efficient.

Richard Bruno: A healthy, safe, and equitable transportation system for Baltimore City would include implementing bus rapid transit, expansion of the rail system (going beyond just building the Red Line to constructing the 5 or 6 lines the city needs), bike paths throughout all the main roads of the city (and not just those in the white L), and in general making transportation by means other than personal car possible and pleasant for people trying to get to any part of the city. The residents of Baltimore deserve a public transportation system which is of a high enough quality to compete with ride-sharing and personal driving, and walkable, bikeable, livable streets. Taking cars off the streets has to be a priority for reasons of social justice, public health, and environmental transition.

Angela C. Gibson: Baltimore City must embrace a viable transportation network which levels the playing field between personal vehicle transportation and walking, biking, and public transportation. Only when we embrace smart growth and transportation options that all residents can easily access will we have a City where economic and personal health is not exclusively tied to what neighborhood you reside.

J.D. Merrill: My vision for a complete transportation system in Baltimore City relies much more heavily on public transportation and cycling than the current city does. I envision a city that has a modern Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system that provides reliable, fast transit along Baltimore’s major corridors, fed by neighborhood lines that get riders to main lines quickly. The city and transportation system should also be substantially more bike friendly. Cycling is healthy for individuals, healthy for the environment, and reduces traffic congestion. A city with a completed Bicycle Master Plan paired with an efficient transit system would be a better city. Automobiles, while hopefully mostly electric in the future, will always play an important role in Baltimore’s transportation system. We also need to work to reduce automobile speed on many streets not only for the safety of cyclists but also for the drivers themselves. Lastly, in dense residential and commercial areas the city should encourage walking as much as it can. Making entire streets walkable should be seriously explored for Baltimore.

George E. Mitchell: A healthy, equitable transportation system involves making sure the bike lanes are big enough so there is no concern about cars hitting bikers being hit. The sidewalks should remain free from cars and debris so people can walk freely without having to get in the street because of an obstruction. Public transportation needs to make sure the bus stops are well lit and secure for people who have to wait at them for the bus.

Sean Stinnett: Walking enhances the nature of small business in the community. When there is biking infrastructure, individuals can travel to neighborhood to neighborhood and can avoid common expenses like parking. Some areas individuals are unable to get to but biking and/or equitable transportation could accommodate.

How does transportation fit in your overall plan for a healthy and economically thriving Maryland? Explain your transportation philosophy.

Tony Bridges: My philosophy on transportation is that Marylanders are better with better transportation options. Studies show that long commutes limit economic opportunities. When projects and policies around transportation are aligned, communities thrive which is why I continue to advocate for transit-oriented development in our neighborhoods. Communities and opportunities should be connected with shorter commutes to places where we live, work, and play. Any new development should also focus on amenities for a more walkable and bikeable community. Walkable communities have health, environmental and economic benefits.

Richard Bruno: Every US city with a thriving economy has a world-class public transportation system. Baltimore must improve its transportation system as a means of economic empowerment for its residents. Public transportation and biking can only be expanded, and freeways can only be removed, with the expenditure of public money and the employment of laborers. So, there are solid Keynesian reasons for infrastructure projects not only in terms of transportation, but also in terms of lead pipe removal, environmental initiatives, school construction, and upgrading of our dilapidated sanitation system.

Complete streets means job creation. Moreover, reducing driving would lower asthma rates by keeping particulate matter out of the air (and would improve the lives of hundreds of my patients who suffer with preventable asthma), helping Baltimore lower its carbon emissions (transportation is the largest single source of emissions nationwide), and lowering the cost of transportation, putting money in the pockets of working families.

My transportation philosophy is that residents have a right to the city: they have a right to move affordably and comfortably from A to B in pursuit of employment, education, and socialization. As long as personal finances remain a determining factor in an individual’s access transportation, they cannot be said to be free, and they remain cut off from opportunities accessible to others in the city and suburbs.

Angela C. Gibson: Baltimore City residents need equitable transportation options in regards to their economic, social and personal health and well being.This can be achieved with a shift from car-centric culture to a diverse transportation system with multiple modes of transportation, particularly a city bicycle network.

J.D. Merrill: Efficient and affordable transportation is a right that should be assured to all Marylanders. The ability to access work, food, and family is fundamental to a healthy and economically thriving Maryland. And we can't do that without a strong transportation system that includes a variety of modalities including public transit, walking, and biking.

George E. Mitchell: There has to be balance between the two. In order for there to be a thriving economic system in Maryland, there has to be a transportation system that across the whole state to where the jobs are located. Having a system that does not serve all who need it defeats the purpose because it does not allow room for growth.

Sean Stinnett: Maryland should be accessible to Maryland residents. People should not have a difficult time trying to get to other cities within the state. There should be more walk-able pathways between city-to-county and county-to-county.



This candidate survey is run by Bikemore In Action, Bikemore's 501c4 advocacy arm.